SUICIDE: Not a Sexy Subject

I am no expert. I have no specialized credentials or formalized training. What I do have is a special love and concern for law enforcement, the military and their families; the lost, the broken and the hurting. What I am is a daughter of a USAF Pilot, I was a spouse to a law enforcement officer, I work with law enforcement, I have experienced friends who have taken their life, and my family has personally been touched as well. I am a survivor. The thoughts and opinions expressed in this article are mine and mine alone.

If you have ever been touched by the pain of depression, suffered the symptoms of PTSD, experienced unwelcomed suicidal ideations, the heartache and heartbreak of grief, either directly or indirectly you may very well agree you are never the same person again. If you have ever been gravely concerned about and helplessly watching a coworker, friend, family member, partner walk through any of these or others you understand first-hand how real the experience is.

One of the biggest dangers, whether it is you or someone you know, is to pretend the suffering is not real and quite simply not address it. If you’re afraid to ask the question for fear of putting the thought into their head, you won’t, but by not talking to them about it may lead to a greater isolation adding rocket fuel to an already silently raging fire.

A quote I read recently did not reference the author yet it really sums it up for me from my experiences, “Suicide does not end the chances of life getting worse; suicide eliminates the possibility of it ever getting better.” However, if or when the symptoms are happening to you one of the last things you may feel like doing is talk to someone or even identify and verbalize the thoughts in your head and the emotions you are experiencing.

Suicide is not a sexy subject. Neither is death, mourning and grief which is a probable cause if it goes ignored. Law enforcement, first responders and military professionals have an even greater challenge admitting to or seeking help because of their profession. It is in my personal opinion, they are at the greatest risk. The often times “suck it up and deal with it” attitude does not foster an atmosphere of health, hope and healing.

Sean Riley is the Founder and President of Safe Call Now. Their website outlines their mission statement: “Safe Call Now is a confidential, comprehensive, 24-hour crisis referral service for all public safety employees, all emergency services personnel and their family members nationwide.” His testimony is powerful, inspiring and brave. You can reach their confidential 24/7 nationwide crisis hotline at 206.459-3020.

Joyce Meyer has a powerful message of hope and resources for anyone you may know who is contemplating suicide or struggling with depression. In “Shining Light in the Darkness” Joyce interviews Chad Daniel of Chad Daniel Ministries, please watch and share. You do not have to walk this alone. You may also request prayer at Joyce Meyer Ministries.

“..Is anyone among you suffering? Then he must pray.” James 5:13 (NASB)

“Are you hurting? Pray. Do you feel great? Sing. Are you sick? Call the church leaders together to pray and anoint you with oil in the name of the Master. Believing-prayer will heal you, and Jesus will put you on your feet. And if you’ve sinned, you’ll be forgiven—healed inside and out.” James 5:13-15 (MSG)

Whether you are experiencing these symptoms or you believe someone you know and/or love might be experiencing any one or many please begin a conversation. You could very well be saving a life.

Below are a links for additional help.

Resources:

Safe Call Now Crisis Lines 24/7-Nationwide
206.459.3020

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

The National Domestic Violence Hotline

American Cancer Society

Focus on the Family Counseling Services and Referrals

Please remember, if you or someone you know is in an immediate life-threatening emergency or danger, please dial 911. Follow up with professional help right away.

God bless you all!

 

Originally published on LinkedIn December 17, 2015

Author: Missy McCann

Image Source: Missy McCann

 

One thought on “SUICIDE: Not a Sexy Subject

  1. Pingback: SUICIDE: Not a Sexy Subject | The "Smart" Blonde

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